FireStation.

La biblioteca del parque.

  • nuevos mensajes por correo.

    Únete a otros 333 seguidores

  • Archivos

  • Estadísticas del blog

    • 1,106,884 hits
  • Visitas

  • Meta

Archivos de la categoría ‘Riesgo Electrico’

Acceso libre a los codigos de la NFPA en version On-Line.

Publicado por Firestation en 28/10/2013

NFPACodes

  • Selecciona el documento que quieras visualizar.
  • Selecciona la edicion del documento que quieras visualizar.
  • Click en el enlace “Free access” (debajo del titulo del documento)
  • Seras invitado a crear un perfil de registro que te dara acceso al documento en su version online y de “solo lectura” del documento.
Code No. Code Name
NFPA 1 Fire Code
NFPA 2 Hydrogen Technologies Code
NFPA 3 Recommended Practice on Commissioning and Integrated Testing of Fire Protection and Life Safety Systems
NFPA 4 Standard for Integrated Fire Protection and Life Safety System Testing
NFPA 10 Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers
NFPA 11 Standard for Low-, Medium-, and High-Expansion Foam
NFPA 11A Standard for Medium- and High-Expansion Foam Systems
NFPA 11C Standard for Mobile Foam Apparatus
NFPA 12 Standard on Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 12A Standard on Halon 1301 Fire Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 13 Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems
NFPA 13D Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One- and Two-Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes
NFPA 13E Recommended Practice for Fire Department Operations in Properties Protected by Sprinkler and Standpipe Systems
NFPA 13R Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in Low-Rise Residential Occupancies
NFPA 14 Standard for the Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems
NFPA 15 Standard for Water Spray Fixed Systems for Fire Protection
NFPA 16 Standard for the Installation of Foam-Water Sprinkler and Foam-Water Spray Systems
NFPA 17 Standard for Dry Chemical Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 17A Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 18 Standard on Wetting Agents
NFPA 18A Standard on Water Additives for Fire Control and Vapor Mitigation
NFPA 20 Standard for the Installation of Stationary Pumps for Fire Protection
NFPA 22 Standard for Water Tanks for Private Fire Protection
NFPA 24 Standard for the Installation of Private Fire Service Mains and Their Appurtenances
NFPA 25 Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems
NFPA 30 Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code
NFPA 30A Code for Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages
NFPA 30B Code for the Manufacture and Storage of Aerosol Products
NFPA 31 Standard for the Installation of Oil-Burning Equipment
NFPA 32 Standard for Drycleaning Plants
NFPA 33 Standard for Spray Application Using Flammable or Combustible Materials
NFPA 34 Standard for Dipping, Coating, and Printing Processes Using Flammable or Combustible Liquids
NFPA 35 Standard for the Manufacture of Organic Coatings
NFPA 36 Standard for Solvent Extraction Plants
NFPA 37 Standard for the Installation and Use of Stationary Combustion Engines and Gas Turbines
NFPA 40 Standard for the Storage and Handling of Cellulose Nitrate Film
NFPA 42 Code for the Storage of Pyroxylin Plastic
NFPA 45 Standard on Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals
NFPA 46 Recommended Safe Practice for Storage of Forest Products
NFPA 50 Standard for Bulk Oxygen Systems at Consumer Sites
NFPA 50A Standard for Gaseous Hydrogen Systems at Consumer Sites
NFPA 50B Standard for Liquefied Hydrogen Systems at Consumer Sites
NFPA 51 Standard for the Design and Installation of Oxygen-Fuel Gas Systems for Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes
NFPA 51A Standard for Acetylene Cylinder Charging Plants
NFPA 51B Standard for Fire Prevention During Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work
NFPA 52 Vehicular Gaseous Fuel Systems Code
NFPA 53 Recommended Practice on Materials, Equipment, and Systems Used in Oxygen-Enriched Atmospheres
NFPA 54 National Fuel Gas Code
NFPA 55 Compressed Gases and Cryogenic Fluids Code
NFPA 56 Standard for Fire and Explosion Prevention During Cleaning and Purging of Flammable Gas Piping Systems
NFPA 57 Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vehicular Fuel Systems Code
NFPA 58 Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code
NFPA 59 Utility LP-Gas Plant Code
NFPA 59A Standard for the Production, Storage, and Handling of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)
NFPA 61 Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities
NFPA 67 Guide on Explosion Protection for Gaseous Mixtures in Pipe Systems
NFPA 68 Standard on Explosion Protection by Deflagration Venting
NFPA 69 Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems
NFPA 70 National Electrical Code®
NFPA 70A National Electrical Code® Requirements for One- and Two-Family Dwellings
NFPA 70B Recommended Practice for Electrical Equipment Maintenance
NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace®
NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code
NFPA 73 Standard for Electrical Inspections for Existing Dwellings
NFPA 75 Standard for the Fire Protection of Information Technology Equipment
NFPA 76 Standard for the Fire Protection of Telecommunications Facilities
NFPA 77 Recommended Practice on Static Electricity
NFPA 79 Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery
NFPA 80 Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives
NFPA 80A Recommended Practice for Protection of Buildings from Exterior Fire Exposures
NFPA 82 Standard on Incinerators and Waste and Linen Handling Systems and Equipment
NFPA 85 Boiler and Combustion Systems Hazards Code
NFPA 86 Standard for Ovens and Furnaces
NFPA 86C Standard for Industrial Furnaces Using a Special Processing Atmosphere
NFPA 86D Standard for Industrial Furnaces Using Vacuum as an Atmosphere
NFPA 87 Recommended Practice for Fluid Heaters
NFPA 88A Standard for Parking Structures
NFPA 88B Standard for Repair Garages
NFPA 90A Standard for the Installation of Air-Conditioning and Ventilating Systems
NFPA 90B Standard for the Installation of Warm Air Heating and Air-Conditioning Systems
NFPA 91 Standard for Exhaust Systems for Air Conveying of Vapors, Gases, Mists, and Noncombustible Particulate Solids
NFPA 92 Standard for Smoke Control Systems
NFPA 92A Standard for Smoke-Control Systems Utilizing Barriers and Pressure Differences
NFPA 92B Standard for Smoke Management Systems in Malls, Atria, and Large Spaces
NFPA 96 Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations
NFPA 97 Standard Glossary of Terms Relating to Chimneys, Vents, and Heat-Producing Appliances
NFPA 99 Health Care Facilities Code
NFPA 99B Standard for Hypobaric Facilities
NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®
NFPA 101A Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety
NFPA 101B Code for Means of Egress for Buildings and Structures
NFPA 102 Standard for Grandstands, Folding and Telescopic Seating, Tents, and Membrane Structures
NFPA 105 Standard for the Installation of Smoke Door Assemblies and Other Opening Protectives
NFPA 110 Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems
NFPA 111 Standard on Stored Electrical Energy Emergency and Standby Power Systems
NFPA 115 Standard for Laser Fire Protection
NFPA 120 Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Coal Mines
NFPA 121 Standard on Fire Protection for Self-Propelled and Mobile Surface Mining Equipment
NFPA 122 Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Metal/Nonmetal Mining and Metal Mineral Processing Facilities
NFPA 123 Standard for Fire Prevention and Control in Underground Bituminous Coal Mines
NFPA 130 Standard for Fixed Guideway Transit and Passenger Rail Systems
NFPA 140 Standard on Motion Picture and Television Production Studio Soundstages, Approved Production Facilities, and Production Locations
NFPA 150 Standard on Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities
NFPA 160 Standard for the Use of Flame Effects Before an Audience
NFPA 170 Standard for Fire Safety and Emergency Symbols
NFPA 203 Guide on Roof Coverings and Roof Deck Constructions
NFPA 204 Standard for Smoke and Heat Venting
NFPA 211 Standard for Chimneys, Fireplaces, Vents, and Solid Fuel-Burning Appliances
NFPA 214 Standard on Water-Cooling Towers
NFPA 220 Standard on Types of Building Construction
NFPA 221 Standard for High Challenge Fire Walls, Fire Walls, and Fire Barrier Walls
NFPA 225 Model Manufactured Home Installation Standard
NFPA 230 Standard for the Fire Protection of Storage
NFPA 231 Standard for General Storage
NFPA 231C Standard for Rack Storage of Materials
NFPA 231D Standard for Storage of Rubber Tires
NFPA 231E Recommended Practice for the Storage of Baled Cotton
NFPA 231F Standard for the Storage of Roll Paper
NFPA 232 Standard for the Protection of Records
NFPA 232A Guide for Fire Protection for Archives and Records Centers
NFPA 241 Standard for Safeguarding Construction, Alteration, and Demolition Operations
NFPA 251 Standard Methods of Tests of Fire Resistance of Building Construction and Materials
NFPA 252 Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Door Assemblies
NFPA 253 Standard Method of Test for Critical Radiant Flux of Floor Covering Systems Using a Radiant Heat Energy Source
NFPA 255 Standard Method of Test of Surface Burning Characteristics of Building Materials
NFPA 256 Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Roof Coverings
NFPA 257 Standard on Fire Test for Window and Glass Block Assemblies
NFPA 258 Recommended Practice for Determining Smoke Generation of Solid Materials
NFPA 259 Standard Test Method for Potential Heat of Building Materials
NFPA 260 Standard Methods of Tests and Classification System for Cigarette Ignition Resistance of Components of Upholstered Furniture
NFPA 261 Standard Method of Test for Determining Resistance of Mock-Up Upholstered Furniture Material Assemblies to Ignition by Smoldering Cigarettes
NFPA 262 Standard Method of Test for Flame Travel and Smoke of Wires and Cables for Use in Air-Handling Spaces
NFPA 265 Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Evaluating Room Fire Growth Contribution of Textile Coverings on Full Height Panels and Walls
NFPA 266 Standard Method of Test for Fire Characteristics of Upholstered Furniture Exposed to Flaming Ignition Source
NFPA 267 Standard Method of Test for Fire Characteristics of Mattresses and Bedding Assemblies Exposed to Flaming Ignition Source
NFPA 268 Standard Test Method for Determining Ignitability of Exterior Wall Assemblies Using a Radiant Heat Energy Source
NFPA 269 Standard Test Method for Developing Toxic Potency Data for Use in Fire Hazard Modeling
NFPA 270 Standard Test Method for Measurement of Smoke Obscuration Using a Conical Radiant Source in a Single Closed Chamber
NFPA 271 Standard Method of Test for Heat and Visible Smoke Release Rates for Materials and Products Using an Oxygen Consumption Calorimeter
NFPA 272 Standard Method of Test for Heat and Visible Smoke Release Rates for Upholstered Furniture Components or Composites and Mattresses Using an Oxygen Consumption Calorimeter
NFPA 274 Standard Test Method to Evaluate Fire Performance Characteristics of Pipe Insulation
NFPA 275 Standard Method of Fire Tests for the Evaluation of Thermal Barriers
NFPA 276 Standard Method of Fire Tests for Determining the Heat Release Rate of Roofing Assemblies with Combustible Above-Deck Roofing Components
NFPA 285 Standard Fire Test Method for Evaluation of Fire Propagation Characteristics of Exterior Non-Load-Bearing Wall Assemblies Containing Combustible Components
NFPA 286 Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Evaluating Contribution of Wall and Ceiling Interior Finish to Room Fire Growth
NFPA 287 Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Flammability of Materials in Cleanrooms Using a Fire Propagation Apparatus (FPA)
NFPA 288 Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Horizontal Fire Door Assemblies Installed in Horizontal Fire Resistance-Rated Assemblies
NFPA 289 Standard Method of Fire Test for Individual Fuel Packages
NFPA 290 Standard for Fire Testing of Passive Protection Materials for Use on LP-Gas Containers
NFPA 291 Recommended Practice for Fire Flow Testing and Marking of Hydrants
NFPA 295 Standard for Wildfire Control
NFPA 297 Guide on Principles and Practices for Communications Systems
NFPA 298 Standard on Foam Chemicals for Wildland Fire Control
NFPA 299 Standard for Protection of Life and Property from Wildfire
NFPA 301 Code for Safety to Life from Fire on Merchant Vessels
NFPA 302 Fire Protection Standard for Pleasure and Commercial Motor Craft
NFPA 303 Fire Protection Standard for Marinas and Boatyards
NFPA 306 Standard for the Control of Gas Hazards on Vessels
NFPA 307 Standard for the Construction and Fire Protection of Marine Terminals, Piers, and Wharves
NFPA 312 Standard for Fire Protection of Vessels During Construction, Conversion, Repair, and Lay-Up
NFPA 318 Standard for the Protection of Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
NFPA 326 Standard for the Safeguarding of Tanks and Containers for Entry, Cleaning, or Repair
NFPA 328 Recommended Practice for the Control of Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases in Manholes, Sewers, and Similar Underground Structures
NFPA 329 Recommended Practice for Handling Releases of Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases
NFPA 350 Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work
NFPA 385 Standard for Tank Vehicles for Flammable and Combustible Liquids
NFPA 386 Standard for Portable Shipping Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids
NFPA 395 Standard for the Storage of Flammable and Combustible Liquids at Farms and Isolated Sites
NFPA 400 Hazardous Materials Code
NFPA 402 Guide for Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Operations
NFPA 403 Standard for Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Services at Airports
NFPA 405 Standard for the Recurring Proficiency of Airport Fire Fighters
NFPA 407 Standard for Aircraft Fuel Servicing
NFPA 408 Standard for Aircraft Hand Portable Fire Extinguishers
NFPA 409 Standard on Aircraft Hangars
NFPA 410 Standard on Aircraft Maintenance
NFPA 412 Standard for Evaluating Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Foam Equipment
NFPA 414 Standard for Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting Vehicles
NFPA 415 Standard on Airport Terminal Buildings, Fueling Ramp Drainage, and Loading Walkways
NFPA 418 Standard for Heliports
NFPA 422 Guide for Aircraft Accident/Incident Response Assessment
NFPA 423 Standard for Construction and Protection of Aircraft Engine Test Facilities
NFPA 424 Guide for Airport/Community Emergency Planning
NFPA 430 Code for the Storage of Liquid and Solid Oxidizers
NFPA 432 Code for the Storage of Organic Peroxide Formulations
NFPA 434 Code for the Storage of Pesticides
NFPA 450 Guide for Emergency Medical Services and Systems
NFPA 471 Recommended Practice for Responding to Hazardous Materials Incidents
NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents
NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents
NFPA 475 Recommended Practice for Responding to Hazardous Materials Incidents/Weapons of Mass Destruction
NFPA 480 Standard for the Storage, Handling, and Processing of Magnesium Solids and Powders
NFPA 481 Standard for the Production, Processing, Handling, and Storage of Titanium
NFPA 482 Standard for the Production, Processing, Handling, and Storage of Zirconium
NFPA 484 Standard for Combustible Metals
NFPA 485 Standard for the Storage, Handling, Processing, and Use of Lithium Metal
NFPA 490 Code for the Storage of Ammonium Nitrate
NFPA 495 Explosive Materials Code
NFPA 496 Standard for Purged and Pressurized Enclosures for Electrical Equipment
NFPA 497 Recommended Practice for the Classification of Flammable Liquids, Gases, or Vapors and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas
NFPA 498 Standard for Safe Havens and Interchange Lots for Vehicles Transporting Explosives
NFPA 499 Recommended Practice for the Classification of Combustible Dusts and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas
NFPA 501 Standard on Manufactured Housing
NFPA 501A Standard for Fire Safety Criteria for Manufactured Home Installations, Sites, and Communities
NFPA 502 Standard for Road Tunnels, Bridges, and Other Limited Access Highways
NFPA 505 Fire Safety Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks Including Type Designations, Areas of Use, Conversions, Maintenance, and Operations
NFPA 513 Standard for Motor Freight Terminals
NFPA 520 Standard on Subterranean Spaces
NFPA 550 Guide to the Fire Safety Concepts Tree
NFPA 551 Guide for the Evaluation of Fire Risk Assessments
NFPA 555 Guide on Methods for Evaluating Potential for Room Flashover
NFPA 556 Guide on Methods for Evaluating Fire Hazard to Occupants of Passenger Road Vehicles
NFPA 557 Standard for Determination of Fire Loads for Use in Structural Fire Protection Design
NFPA 560 Standard for the Storage, Handling, and Use of Ethylene Oxide for Sterilization and Fumigation
NFPA 600 Standard on Industrial Fire Brigades
NFPA 601 Standard for Security Services in Fire Loss Prevention
NFPA 610 Guide for Emergency and Safety Operations at Motorsports Venues
NFPA 650 Standard for Pneumatic Conveying Systems for Handling Combustible Particulate Solids
NFPA 651 Standard for the Machining and Finishing of Aluminum and the Production and Handling of Aluminum Powders
NFPA 652 Standard on Combustible Dusts
NFPA 654 Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Dust Explosions from the Manufacturing, Processing, and Handling of Combustible Particulate Solids
NFPA 655 Standard for Prevention of Sulfur Fires and Explosions
NFPA 664 Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Explosions in Wood Processing and Woodworking Facilities
NFPA 701 Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Flame Propagation of Textiles and Films
NFPA 703 Standard for Fire Retardant—Treated Wood and Fire–Retardant Coatings for Building Materials
NFPA 704 Standard System for the Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response
NFPA 705 Recommended Practice for a Field Flame Test for Textiles and Films
NFPA 720 Standard for the Installation of Carbon Monoxide(CO) Detection and Warning Equipment
NFPA 730 Guide for Premises Security
NFPA 731 Standard for the Installation of Electronic Premises Security Systems
NFPA 750 Standard on Water Mist Fire Protection Systems
NFPA 780 Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems
NFPA 790 Standard for Competency of Third-Party Field Evaluation Bodies
NFPA 791 Recommended Practice and Procedures for Unlabeled Electrical Equipment Evaluation
NFPA 801 Standard for Fire Protection for Facilities Handling Radioactive Materials
NFPA 803 Standard for Fire Protection for Light Water Nuclear Power Plants
NFPA 804 Standard for Fire Protection for Advanced Light Water Reactor Electric Generating Plants
NFPA 805 Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Light Water Reactor Electric Generating Plants
NFPA 806 Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Electric Generating Plants Change Process
NFPA 820 Standard for Fire Protection in Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities
NFPA 850 Recommended Practice for Fire Protection for Electric Generating Plants and High Voltage Direct Current Converter Stations
NFPA 851 Recommended Practice for Fire Protection for Hydroelectric Generating Plants
NFPA 853 Standard for the Installation of Stationary Fuel Cell Power Systems
NFPA 900 Building Energy Code
NFPA 901 Standard Classifications for Incident Reporting and Fire Protection Data
NFPA 902 Fire Reporting Field Incident Guide
NFPA 903 Fire Reporting Property Survey Guide
NFPA 904 Incident Follow-up Report Guide
NFPA 906 Guide for Fire Incident Field Notes
NFPA 909 Code for the Protection of Cultural Resource Properties – Museums, Libraries, and Places of Worship
NFPA 914 Code for Fire Protection of Historic Structures
NFPA 921 Guide for Fire and Explosion Investigations
NFPA 950 Standard for Data Development and Exchange for the Fire Service
NFPA 951 Guide to Building and Utilizing Digital Information
NFPA 1000 Standard for Fire Service Professional Qualifications Accreditation and Certification Systems
NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1002 Standard for Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1003 Standard for Airport Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1005 Standard for Professional Qualifications for Marine Fire Fighting for Land-Based Fire Fighters
NFPA 1006 Standard for Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1021 Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1026 Standard for Incident Management Personnel Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1031 Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Inspector and Plan Examiner
NFPA 1033 Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Investigator
NFPA 1035 Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire and Life Safety Educator, Public Information Officer, and Juvenile Firesetter Intervention
NFPA 1037 Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Marshal
NFPA 1041 Standard for Fire Service Instructor Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1051 Standard for Wildland Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1061 Professional Qualifications for Public Safety Telecommunications Personnel
NFPA 1071 Standard for Emergency Vehicle Technician Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1072 Standard for Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Emergency Response Personnel Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1081 Standard for Industrial Fire Brigade Member Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1091 Standard for Traffic Control Incident Management Professional Qualifications
NFPA 1122 Code for Model Rocketry
NFPA 1123 Code for Fireworks Display
NFPA 1124 Code for the Manufacture, Transportation, Storage, and Retail Sales of Fireworks and Pyrotechnic Articles
NFPA 1125 Code for the Manufacture of Model Rocket and High Power Rocket Motors
NFPA 1126 Standard for the Use of Pyrotechnics Before a Proximate Audience
NFPA 1127 Code for High Power Rocketry
PYR 1128 Standard Method of Fire Test for Flame Breaks
PYR 1129 Standard Method of Fire Test for Covered Fuse on Consumer Fireworks
NFPA 1141 Standard for Fire Protection Infrastructure for Land Development in Wildland, Rural, and Suburban Areas
NFPA 1142 Standard on Water Supplies for Suburban and Rural Fire Fighting
NFPA 1143 Standard for Wildland Fire Management
NFPA 1144 Standard for Reducing Structure Ignition Hazards from Wildland Fire
NFPA 1145 Guide for the Use of Class A Foams in Manual Structural Fire Fighting
NFPA 1150 Standard on Foam Chemicals for Fires in Class A Fuels
NFPA 1192 Standard on Recreational Vehicles
NFPA 1194 Standard for Recreational Vehicle Parks and Campgrounds
NFPA 1201 Standard for Providing Emergency Services to the Public
NFPA 1221 Standard for the Installation, Maintenance, and Use of Emergency Services Communications Systems
NFPA 1231 Standard on Water Supplies for Suburban and Rural Fire Fighting
NFPA 1250 Recommended Practice in Fire and Emergency Service Organization Risk Management
NFPA 1401 Recommended Practice for Fire Service Training Reports and Records
NFPA 1402 Guide to Building Fire Service Training Centers
NFPA 1403 Standard on Live Fire Training Evolutions
NFPA 1404 Standard for Fire Service Respiratory Protection Training
NFPA 1405 Guide for Land-Based Fire Departments that Respond to Marine Vessel Fires
NFPA 1407 Standard for Fire Service Rapid Intervention Crews
NFPA 1408 Standard on Thermal Imaging Training
NFPA 1410 Standard on Training for Initial Emergency Scene Operations
NFPA 1451 Standard for a Fire and Emergency Services Vehicle Operations Training Program
NFPA 1452 Guide for Training Fire Service Personnel to Conduct Dwelling Fire Safety Surveys
NFPA 1500 Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program
NFPA 1521 Standard for Fire Department Safety Officer
NFPA 1561 Standard on Emergency Services Incident Management System
NFPA 1581 Standard on Fire Department Infection Control Program
NFPA 1582 Standard on Comprehensive Occupational Medical Program for Fire Departments
NFPA 1583 Standard on Health-Related Fitness Programs for Fire Department Members
NFPA 1584 Standard on the Rehabilitation Process for Members During Emergency Operations and Training Exercises
NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs
NFPA 1620 Standard for Pre-Incident Planning
NFPA 1670 Standard on Operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents
NFPA 1710 Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations, and Special Operations to the Public by Career Fire Departments
NFPA 1720 Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations and Special Operations to the Public by Volunteer Fire Departments
NFPA 1730 Standard on Organization and Deployment of Fire Prevention Inspection and Code Enforcement, Plan Review, Investigation, and Public Education Operations to the Public
NFPA 1801 Standard on Thermal Imagers for the Fire Service
NFPA 1802 Standard on Two-Way, Portable (Hand-held) Land Mobile Radios for Use by Emergency Services Personnel
NFPA 1851 Standard on Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting
NFPA 1852 Standard on Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Open-Circuit Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA)
NFPA 1855 Standard for Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Protective Ensembles for Technical Rescue Incidents
NFPA 1901 Standard for Automotive Fire Apparatus
NFPA 1906 Standard for Wildland Fire Apparatus
NFPA 1911 Standard for the Inspection, Maintenance, Testing, and Retirement of In-Service Automotive Fire Apparatus
NFPA 1912 Standard for Fire Apparatus Refurbishing
NFPA 1914 Standard for Testing Fire Department Aerial Devices
NFPA 1915 Standard for Fire Apparatus Preventive Maintenance Program
NFPA 1917 Standard for Automotive Ambulances
NFPA 1925 Standard on Marine Fire-Fighting Vessels
NFPA 1931 Standard for Manufacturer’s Design of Fire Department Ground Ladders
NFPA 1932 Standard on Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service Fire Department Ground Ladders
NFPA 1936 Standard on Powered Rescue Tools
NFPA 1951 Standard on Protective Ensembles for Technical Rescue Incidents
NFPA 1952 Standard on Surface Water Operations Protective Clothing and Equipment
NFPA 1953 Standard on Protective Ensembles for Contaminated Water Diving
NFPA 1961 Standard on Fire Hose
NFPA 1962 Standard for the Care, Use, Inspection, Service Testing, and Replacement of Fire Hose, Couplings, Nozzles, and Fire Hose Appliances
NFPA 1963 Standard for Fire Hose Connections
NFPA 1964 Standard for Spray Nozzles
NFPA 1965 Standard for Fire Hose Appliances
NFPA 1971 Standard on Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting
NFPA 1975 Standard on Station/Work Uniforms for Emergency Services
NFPA 1976 Standard on Protective Ensemble for Proximity Fire Fighting
NFPA 1977 Standard on Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Fire Fighting
NFPA 1981 Standard on Open-Circuit Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) for Emergency Services
NFPA 1982 Standard on Personal Alert Safety Systems (PASS)
NFPA 1983 Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services
NFPA 1984 Standard on Respirators for Wildland Fire Fighting Operations
NFPA 1989 Standard on Breathing Air Quality for Emergency Services Respiratory Protection
NFPA 1991 Standard on Vapor-Protective Ensembles for Hazardous Materials Emergencies
NFPA 1992 Standard on Liquid Splash-Protective Ensembles and Clothing for Hazardous Materials Emergencies
NFPA 1994 Standard on Protective Ensembles for First Responders to CBRN Terrorism Incidents
NFPA 1999 Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations
NFPA 2001 Standard on Clean Agent Fire Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 2010 Standard for Fixed Aerosol Fire-Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 2112 Standard on Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire
NFPA 2113 Standard on Selection, Care, Use, and Maintenance of Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire
NFPA 5000 Building Construction and Safety Code®
NFPA 8501 Standard for Single Burner Boiler Operation
NFPA 8502 Standard for the Prevention of Furnace Explosions/Implosions in Multiple Burner Boilers
NFPA 8503 Standard for Pulverized Fuel Systems
NFPA 8504 Standard on Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Boiler Operation
NFPA 8505 Standard for Stoker Operation
NFPA 8506 Standard on Heat Recovery Steam Generator Systems

Publicado en Agentes Extintores, Bombas, Edificacion, Incendios, Legislacion, Prevencion, Riesgo Electrico, Señalizacion Emergencias, Sistemas fijos de extincion, Teoria del fuego | 1 Comment »

Incendios ocasionados por rayos

Publicado por Firestation en 11/02/2013

rayo en arbol incendio

Por Kathleen Robinson

Sus impactos ocasionan daños de millones de dólares cada año

Este año se cumple el quinto aniversario de la catástrofe en la mina de carbón de Sago, West Virginia, donde fallecieron 12 mineros en el incendio con mayor mortalidad de los iniciados por un rayo en los Estados Unidos en casi 40 años.

Según la edición con fecha 3 de enero de 2006, de The Charleston Gazette, la explosión tuvo lugar alrededor de las 6:30 a.m., a sólo media hora de abierta la mina. De los 29 hombres que trabajaban en la mina, uno pereció en la explosión. Dieciséis pudieron escapar ilesos, y los 12 restantes, atrapados por el colapso, se resguardaron detrás de una barricada que construyeron para aguardar el rescate, según el informe de investigación elaborado por la Administración de Salud y Seguridad Minera (MSHA) del Departamento de Trabajo de los EEUU, División de Salud y Seguridad en Minas de Carbón.

Unas 41 horas luego de la explosión, los rescatistas finalmente pudieron alcanzar a los mineros atrapados, de los cuales solo uno sobrevivió.

El informe de la MSHA dice que la explosión ocurrió aproximadamente a 2 millas (3.2 kilómetros) de la entrada de la mina cuando un rayo impactó en un cable y lo siguió hasta adentro de la mina, donde encendió gas metano.

Este es sólo uno de los 24,600 incendios iniciados por un rayo que fueron reportados anualmente a los departamentos de bomberos de los EEUU en los cinco años desde 2004 hasta 2008, según un nuevo informe de investigación de la NFPA, Incendios Ocasionados por Rayos e Impacto de Rayos. Estos incendios causan en promedio, la muerte de 12 civiles, 47 lesiones a civiles, y $407 millones de dólares de daños a la propiedad cada año.

“A pesar de que los incendios por rayos representan una porción relativamente pequeña del problema general de los incendios, las cifras aún continúan siendo importantes,” dice Ben Evarts, el autor del estudio. “Esto es importante para que la gente sepa, que aunque el término se utilice habitualmente en conversaciones para hacer referencia a algo que es poco probable, es de hecho, un evento bastante común.”

No hay necesidad de decir que, los incendios que se inician con el impacto de un rayo en las profundidades de una mina son muy poco habituales. En promedio, el 74 por ciento de los incendios causados por rayos y que son informados anualmente a los departamentos de bomberos locales desde el año 2004 al 2008, ocurrieron en espacios exteriores. Los incendios forestales que se iniciaron por el impacto de rayos alcanzaron en promedio a unos 5.5 millones de acres (2, 225,771 hectáreas) por año, o al 66 por ciento de los 8.2 millones de acres alcanzados por incendios forestales (3, 318,422 hectáreas) al año, según el Centro Nacional de Incendios Interinstitucional. El incendio forestal promedio ocasionado por un rayo alcanzó los 500 acres (202 hectáreas), mientras que el incendio promedio iniciado por humanos alcanzó casi los 40 acres (16 hectáreas).

Sólo el 18 por ciento de los incendios iniciados por rayos desde 2004 a 2008 ocurrieron en el hogar. No obstante, dieron por resultado el 88 por ciento de las muertes asociadas de civiles en situación de incendio, el 77 por ciento de las lesiones por incendio a civiles, y el 70 por ciento del daño directo a la propiedad, cifras informadas anualmente a los departamentos de bomberos locales.

El impacto de rayos que no inician un incendio, también es mortal. En promedio, estos impactos dieron muerte a 38 personas al año desde 2004 a 2008, según informa el Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. Sólo en el año 2008, los rayos causaron 27 muertes confirmadas y 216 lesiones confirmadas. El cuarenta y seis por ciento de aquellas personas fallecidas por rayos se encontraba en espacios exteriores de áreas abiertas.

“Los incendios exteriores iniciados por rayos son mucho más destructivos en promedio, en términos del alcance de acres, que aquellos iniciados por causas humanas,” dice Evarts.

No sorprende, que los incendios por rayos y los impactos de rayos que no resultaron en incendios, son más comunes durante el verano que en cualquier otra época del año.

Alrededor de la mitad de todos los incendios ocasionados por rayos y casi tres quintos de los impactos de rayos que no causan incendios, se reportaron entre julio y agosto, y los incendios por rayos tienen su pico hacia el final de la tarde y al anochecer. Un poco más de la mitad de todos los incendios iniciados por rayos ocurren entre las 3 y 9 p.m.

Los cinco estados principales donde se produjeron el total de los fallecimientos ocasionados por rayos fueron Florida, Colorado, Texas, Georgia, y Carolina del Norte, mientras que los cinco estados principales donde se produjeron muertes ocasionadas por rayos por millón de pobladores fueron Wyoming, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, y Carolina del Norte. Los cinco estados principales sonde se produjeron relámpagos por milla cuadrada fueron Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, y Carolina del Sur.

¿Cómo protegerse de los rayos?

Primeramente, se debe seguir la regla del 30-30: Cuando se observa un rayo, hay que contar los segundos hasta que se escucha el trueno. Si el tiempo transcurrido es de 30 segundos o menos, la tormenta eléctrica se encuentra dentro de las 6 millas (9.6 kilómetros) y es peligrosa. En otras palabras, si puede oír los truenos, usted se encuentra dentro de la zona de impacto del rayo.

Si se encuentra en un espacio interior, dice Evarts, desconecte todos los artefactos eléctricos, las computadoras y equipos de aire acondicionado. Si no puede desconectarlos, apáguelos. Aléjese de los teléfonos de línea de tierra, computadoras, y cualquier otro equipo eléctrico que lo ponga en contacto directo con la electricidad o la plomería. Evite lavarse las manos, ducharse, bañarse, lavar la ropa o los platos.

Si se encuentra en un espacio exterior, deje lo que esté haciendo al primer trueno y entre en alguna vivienda, algún edificio o vehículo con techo sólido. Si se encuentra en aguas abiertas, diríjase a tierra y busque refugio inmediatamente. Recuerde que la amenaza de rayos continúa por más tiempo del que podría imaginar. Espere al menos 30 minutos después del último trueno antes de abandonar el refugio.

Si no puede refugiarse y siente que su cabello se eriza, indicando que se aproxima el impacto de un rayo, agáchese despegando los talones del piso y coloque las manos sobre sus oídos y la cabeza entre sus rodillas. Tanto como pueda, haga que su cuerpo se convierta en el blanco más pequeño de impacto y minimice su contacto con la tierra. No se tienda horizontalmente en la tierra.

Si usted ve que alguien es alcanzado por un rayo, llame al 911 y busque ayuda en forma inmediata. Las víctimas de impactos de rayos no tienen carga eléctrica, de modo que puede inmediatamente chequear la respiración, latidos cardíacos y pulso.

Promedios anuales de incendios ocasionados por el impacto de rayos reportados al Departamento de Bomberos local por tipo de Incendio 2004-2008

  • 4,400 incendios residenciales dieron muerte a 10 civiles, lesionaron a 36, y ocasionaron daños directos en propiedades por un valor de $283 millones
  • 1,800 incendios estructurales no residenciales dieron muerte a 1 civil, lesionaron a 6, y ocasionaron daños directos en propiedades por un valor de $90 millones
  • 18,200 incendios exteriores y sin clasificar dieron muerte a 0 civiles, lesionaron a 2, y ocasionaron daños directos en la propiedad por un valor de $33 millones
  • 100 incendios de vehículos dieron muerte a 0 civiles, lesionaron a 2, y ocasionaron daños directos en la propiedad por un valor de $2 millones

http://www.nfpajournal-latino.com/

Publicado en Incendios, Monografias / Articulos / Investigaciones, Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

REAL DECRETO 614/2001, de 8 de junio, sobre disposiciones mínimas para la protección de la salud y seguridad de los trabajadores frente al riesgo eléctrico.

Publicado por Firestation en 03/04/2012

Publicado en Legislacion, Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Arcos electricos: Mitos y realidades.

Publicado por Firestation en 27/03/2011

Por Alejandro M. Llaneza, Patricio M. Llaneza, Randell B. Hirschmann & Thomas E. Neal

Pocos trabajadores eléctricos considerarían trabajar sobre un sistema de 13.8kV sin los guantes aislantes apropiados para esa tensión. Similarmente, en muchos lugares de trabajo se está acudiendo a asesores, ingenieros eléctricos, fabricantes de ropa, normas y estándares como guías para lograr un lugar de trabajo seguro frente a los peligros de los arcos eléctricos. Sin embargo, existen varios Mitos que deben ser tratados:

Mito: Las explosiones por arcos eléctricos no suceden, porque nunca vi una.

Realidad: Siendo optimistas, la mayoría de los trabajadores eléctricos nunca verán un accidente por arco eléctrico. Sin embargo, el trabajo eléctrico es peligroso por naturaleza debido a los altos niveles de energía implicados y a la Realidad de que hasta tanto un accidente no suceda, la electricidad es inodora, incolora y esencialmente invisible. Los trabajadores eléctricos han elegido la tercera profesión más peligrosa, de acuerdo a recientes estadísticas de OSHA. Se “reportan” más de 10 incidentes de arco eléctrico que implican más de 2 fatalidades a diario en los EEUU. Estudios indican que hasta un 80% de las heridas de todos los trabajadores eléctricos no corresponden a choques eléctricos (paso de corriente a través del cuerpo) sino que se deben a quemaduras externas, creadas por la intensa radiación de energía radiante de una exposición a arco eléctrico.

Mito: No hay nada que alguien pueda hacer para protegerse contra la exposición a un arco eléctrico.

Realidad: Son muchas las cosas que se pueden hacer para prevenir un arco eléctrico y proteger al personal expuesto a arcos eléctricos. La NFPA ha desarrollado la Norma para la seguridad eléctrica en lugares de trabajo, NFPA 70E, para reducir el número de accidentes que ocurren en los lugares de trabajo. La norma provee una guía para la correcta selección del EPP (Equipo de Protección Personal) para reducir ampliamente o evitar heridas en un evento de arco eléctrico. Un programa de seguridad eléctrica es como las cuatro patas de una silla, cada una es indispensable para mantener un lugar de trabajo seguro.

  • Trabajador Eléctrico : Calificado y capacitado para desarrollar la tarea.
  • Ingeniería de Control : Diseño y ajustes de los sistemas para reducir los niveles de peligro.
  • Procedimientos de Trabajo : Procedimientos y prácticas seguras de trabajo que reduzcan la posibilidad o severidad de un accidente.
  • Equipo de Protección Personal : La última línea de defensa del trabajador; incluyendo vestimenta, protección facial y guantes para la protección del operario a los arcos eléctricos.

El remover alguna de las “patas de la silla” podrá derivar en heridas graves o muerte de trabajadores.

Mito: La vestimenta de algodón o de otras fibras naturales me protegerá.

Realidad: El algodón y la lana son definitivamente fibras inflamables que pueden encenderse al ser expuestas a la intensa radiación de un evento de arco eléctrico. Cuando la ropa se enciende, continúa quemándose sobre el cuerpo del usuario aseverando y extendiendo las heridas con posibles quemaduras de segundo y tercer grado. De esta manera, pueden sufrirse heridas de quemaduras en porciones del cuerpo que no han sido expuestas directamente (inicialmente) al arco eléctrico. Mientras la combustión del algodón u otra vestimenta inflamable continúen avanzando a otras áreas del cuerpo, las heridas por quemaduras incrementaran. Las vestimentas Resistente a la Llama (RLL) que cumplen con los requerimientos de las normas ASTM F1506, ASTM F1959 y NFPA 70E no se encenderán, no continuaran quemándose sobre la piel y adicionalmente proporcionarán protección térmica a las áreas del cuerpo que cubren. Se confeccionan trajes para arcos eléctricos con múltiples capas de telas livianas para alcanzar los niveles de protección necesarios para cubrir el amplio rango de los peligros eléctricos. La norma NFPA 70E provee una guía (ejemplo) para la correcta selección del EPP, que corresponda al nivel de peligro determinado por la tarea eléctrica a desarrollar.

Mito: Las gafas y anteojos de seguridad protegen de la exposición a la energía de un arco eléctrico.

Realidad: Existen diversos tipos de gafas y anteojos de seguridad, pero no existe ninguno que tenga asignado un nivel de protección para arcos eléctricos. La superficie del área protegida por los lentes es limitada a tan solo una pequeña fracción de la cara y al no tener un nivel de protección para arcos eléctricos el usuario no puede saber con que protección cuenta. Solo un protector facial o capucha (con nivel de protección asignado y certificado) puede ofrecer protección contra la energía termal de un arco eléctrico y debe ser seleccionado cuando supere el nivel de peligro de arco eléctrico de la tarea a realizar.

Mito: Si utilizo un protector facial, esa es protección suficiente.

Realidad: Esto dependerá del protector facial y del peligro al cual sea expuesto. En el mercado existen protectores faciales que cuentan con un nivel de protección ATPV (Valor de Protección Termal al Arco), el cual se determina en cal/cm² (calorías por centímetro cuadrado). Los protectores faciales para arco eléctrico deben ser probados, según el protocolo de prueba de la norma ASTM F2178 para determinar su nivel de protección a los arcos eléctricos. Estos protectores deben ser utilizados para todos los trabajos eléctricos donde el peligro es mayor a 1,2 cal/cm² y no supera las 8 cal/cm², o según NFPA 70E para las Categorías de Riesgo / Peligro (CRP) 0, 1 y el mínimo requerimiento de la 2 (8cal/cm²). Sin embargo, muchos en la industria continúan utilizando protectores faciales claros para protegerse del riesgo de arco eléctrico. Durante el 2003 Oberon Company realizó investigaciones sobre los protectores faciales claros (transparentes) fabricados en poli-carbonato con protección UV extendida. En esta investigación se determinó, que estos protectores y las ventanas claras utilizadas en algunas capuchas (escafandras) no ofrecen ningún grado significativo de protección durante un evento de arco eléctrico. La razón de la anecdótica evidencia con respecto a la protección ofrecida por protectores faciales claros es confusa. Puede haber casos en los que el trabajador no enfrentó directamente la fuente del arco cuando el evento de arco eléctrico ocurrió. O bien el área de la cara se pudo haber expuesto a niveles más bajos de la energía termal que otras partes del cuerpo, causando la falsa impresión de que un protector facial claro brindó protección. Cualquier sea el caso, las pruebas de arco eléctrico en laboratorio indicaron que incluso a un nivel muy bajo de exposición (2,7cal/cm²), los sensores termales ubicados en los ojos y boca del maniquí del método de pruebas, indicaron quemaduras de segundo grado.

Mito: Si utilizo un protector facial, no necesito utilizar una capucha o escafandra.

Realidad: Un protector facial con nivel de protección a los arcos eléctricos asignado en cal/cm² protegerá efectivamente las áreas que cubre, es decir la cara y hasta cierto punto la parte frontal del cuello. Dependiendo del diseño del protector facial, la energía de convección podrá viajar por debajo del mismo causando quemaduras en la cara, especialmente en niveles altos de exposición a arcos eléctricos. El protector facial tampoco protegerá los costados ni la parte posterior de la cabeza y cuello, mientras que una capucha con nivel de protección a arco eléctrico, protege de manera uniforme la cabeza y el cuello en su totalidad. Según la NFPA 70E el uso de protectores faciales está limitado para las tareas de hasta el nivel mínimo de la CRP 2. Para trabajos asignados dentro de las CRP 2, 3 y 4 se requiere el uso de capuchas.

Mito: Todas las telas Resistentes a la Llama (RLL) son iguales.

Realidad: Esto no es así, dado que existen dos tipos de telas RLL:

  • La tela Resistente a la Llama Tratada químicamente (FRT o RLLT)
  • La tela Inherentemente Resistente a la Llama (IFR o IRLL),

La tela FRT es simple algodón, resistente a la llama debido al tratamiento que se le aplica a la tela. Investigaciones y resultados del uso de este tipo de tela en la industria, demostraron los siguientes resultados:

  • Limitaciones de Lavado y Mantenimiento: Puede perder su nivel de protección con los lavados de la vestimenta
  • Peso y Productividad: Pesan más de un 50% que las telas IFR, contribuyendo así al incremento de temperatura en el cuerpo del usuario, y quitándole cierta productividad al entorpecerlo.
  • Durabilidad: Dura hasta 5 veces menos que una tela IFR
  • Reacción Exotérmica: Protege hasta el punto donde el sistema químico que apaga la flama se activa, esto es cuando las fibras se encienden. Cuando esto sucede hay una reacción exotérmica, lo que significa que emite calor cuando esta reacción sucede. Una vez que se supera el nivel de protección de las fibras esta reacción exotérmica hará que la energía emitida, en forma de gas caliente, queme al usuario causando quemaduras de 2do, 3er grado e infecciones. Cuando esta reacción toma lugar, los gases calientes del FRT, bajo el nivel de protección apagan el fuego de las fibras. Pero, si se supera el nivel de protección, estos gases nocivos serán emitidos pudiendo causar también problemas respiratorios dentro de la capucha y haciendo que el trabajador tenga que sacársela aun estando en una situación de riesgo.

La tela IFR posee fibras con una estructura química que no permite que queme en el aire, es por eso que los resultados de estas son mucho más favorables que aquellos demostrados por las FRT:

  • Lavado: Jamás perderá su nivel de protección debido al lavado de la vestimenta.
  • Peso y Productividad: Pesan menos del 50% que las FRT, permitiendo al usuario realizar sus tareas de forma más conveniente y segura.
  • Durabilidad: Pueden durar hasta 5 veces más que las telas FRT.
  • Reacción Exotérmica: No existe tal efecto en las telas IFR.

Adicionalmente, en cuestión de telas IFR se han desarrollado telas para trajes de arcos eléctricos que hacen la única línea de EPP en el ámbito mundial desarrollada con materiales exclusivos para la protección a los arcos eléctricos. A diferencia de las líneas de trajes FRT, utilizan telas provenientes de otras aplicaciones de la industria y se adaptan a la protección de arcos eléctricos, trayendo consigo aquellos aspectos negativos mencionados anteriormente.

Mito: ATPV = Protección 100% .

Realidad: ATPV o “Valor de Protección Termal al Arco” es la asignación dada a telas, protectores faciales, uniformes y trajes para arcos eléctricos, su unidad de medida es cal/cm². La recientemente aprobada definición para el método de pruebas ASTM F1959 dice que ATPV “es la energía incidente sobre una tela o material que resulte en suficiente transferencia de energía a través del espécimen bajo prueba que resulta en un 50% de probabilidades de que existan quemaduras de segundo grado”. No obstante, el nuevo método analítico de las pruebas de arco eléctrico presentado por ASTM F1959, provee valores de la energía incidente en cal/cm² que resultan en menores probabilidades de quemaduras de segundo grado. Los valores de protección que presenta este método van desde un 40% a un 1% de probabilidades de heridas por quemaduras. El usuario del EPP no debería estar seleccionando su traje basado en que exista un 50% de probabilidades de quemaduras de segundo grado al momento de un accidente, por el contrario, debería siempre apuntar a que no existan posibilidades de quemaduras.

Mito: La vestimenta aluminizada es una alternativa efectiva para la protección contra arcos eléctricos.

Realidad: La vestimenta aluminizada es efectiva como barrera contra la energía radiante en una exposición a arco eléctrico, pero debido a que el aluminio es un buen conductor de electricidad, la tela aluminizada puede aumentar las probabilidades de que suceda un accidente de arco eléctrico. Oberon ha demostrado en pruebas de arco realizadas en el laboratorio Kinectrics, que las telas aluminizadas pueden actuar para iniciar un arco eléctrico, reduciendo la distancia entre los electrodos utilizados en el método de prueba ASTM F1959. De igual manera las telas aluminizadas pueden causar el inicio de un arco eléctrico al reducir el espacio de aire (aislamiento) entre los conductores de un equipo o sistema eléctrico.

Mito: Si identifico la Categoría de Riesgo / Peligro de mis trabajos utilizando las Tablas 130.7(C)(11) y 130.7(C)(9)(a) de la NFPA 70E, puedo evitar hacer los análisis de riesgos de arco eléctrico y usar esos resultados para determinar que EPP debo utilizar.

Realidad: Si todas las variables de la Tabla 130.7(C)(9)(a) son idénticas a las de los su red eléctrica, entonces pueden utilizarla con ese fin. La Tabla 130.7(C)(11) de CRP y valores de cal/cm² junto a la Tabla 130.7(C)(9)(a) de tareas eléctricas, fue desarrollada como guía (ejemplo) por la NFPA 70E con el fin de facilitar la selección del EPP según la tarea a realizar por el operario. Desgraciadamente, la Realidad muestra que en la mayoría de los casos los ejemplos de la norma no se asemejan a aquellos de la Realidad que vemos día tras día en la industria. Es por esta razón que la NFPA 70E hace saber al lector que si cualquiera de esas variables cambia (Ej.: distancias de trabajo, corrientes de falla, tiempos de acción de las protecciones, etc.) los niveles de energía de arco eléctrico pueden aumentar, dejando así obsoleto el EPP recomendado en la Tabla 130.7(C)(11) y poniendo en peligro al trabajador.

NFPA 70E recomienda que se haga un análisis de riesgo en cada lugar de trabajo, utilizando las variables únicas de sus propias instalaciones, mediante las formulas ofrecidas en la norma. Las alternativas para hacer los análisis de riesgos son: hacerlos en una planilla de cálculos basado en las formulas de NFPA 70E (IEEE 1584), contratar servicios de ingeniería o bien hacerlos con uno de los tantos programas informáticos (softwares) que se encuentran hoy en el mercado.

Existen varios excelentes recursos disponibles para crear un lugar de trabajo seguro, como la misma NPFA 70E (ahora disponible la nueva versión en español), el portal en español de NFPA 70E en línea www.nfpa70e.info, un sitio donde podrá obtener la más actualizada información sobre la norma y otros importantes recursos adicionales, y www.ArcosElectricos.com donde encontrarán notas, artículos y ensayos de gran interés.

Hay un dicho en la industria que dice: “La seguridad no sucede por accidente”, debemos obtener el conocimiento, educarnos, entrenar y utilizar el correcto EPP, esto hará la diferencia entre volver a casa esta noche…o no.

Randell B. Hirschmann, (Gerente de Producción y Miembro del Grupo Investigación & Desarrollo de Productos. Oberon Company). Educador en Seguridad y EPP (Equipamiento de Protección Personal) para la industria en general. Una familia con más de 65 años de experiencia en la industria de la seguridad.

Thomas E. Neal, (Neal Associates Ltd.) Doctorado en Química Analítica, Gte. de Tecnología e Ingeniería Eléctrica del Laboratorio de Pruebas de Energías Termales de DuPont de Nemours. Más de 25 años de experiencia en fibras, telas de alto rendimiento y vestimenta de protección para los arcos eléctricos y fuegos repentinos. Reconocido en la industria como una de las personas de más conocimiento y experiencia en desarrollo de EPP para arcos eléctricos. Miembro de comités relacionados con peligros eléctricos, arcos eléctricos y fuegos repentinos, entre ellos IEEE 1584, ASTM F18, F23, F1506, F1891, F1930, F2178, NFPA 70E, 2112 y 2113.

Patricio M. Llaneza, (Representante para Latino América de Oberon Company). Licenciado en Comercialización, Consultor, Instructor y Educador en Seguridad y EPP (Equipamiento de Protección Personal) para las Industrias Petroquímica, Eléctrica y General. Colaborador en artículos especializados de seguridad industrial. Orador, Editor de la nueva norma NFPA 70E en español.

Alejandro M. Llaneza, (Gerente del Soporte Técnico Avanzado, Proyectos Especiales, y Miembro del Grupo de R&D. Oberon Company) Consultor, Instructor y Educador en Seguridad y EPP (Equipamiento de Protección Personal) para las Industrias Petroquímica, Eléctrica y General. Escritor y Colaborador en artículos especializados para Revistas y Portales de la Industria. Redactor de normas / estándares de seguridad eléctrica y EPP para corporaciones / compañías privadas y gubernamentales de la industria Latinoamericana, Europea, Africana y Asiática. Traductor, Orador y Participante activo en la promoción de la norma NFPA 70E en el ámbito mundial.

http://www.nfpajournal-latino.com/

Publicado en Monografias / Articulos / Investigaciones, Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Riesgos y Pautas de Actuacion en Instalaciones con Riesgo Electrico. Curso de Iberdrola para Bomberos Ayto. Valencia.

Publicado por Firestation en 04/01/2009

dibujo48

Publicado en Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Bomberos Expuestos a Riesgos Electricos Durante Operaciones de Extincion de Incendios Forestales.

Publicado por Firestation en 04/01/2009

dibujo47

Publicado en Incendios Forestales, Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Riesgo Electrico.

Publicado por Firestation en 04/01/2009

dibujo46

Publicado en Riesgo Electrico | 2 Comments »

Los Riesgos Electricos y su Ingenieria de Seguridad.

Publicado por Firestation en 04/01/2009

dibujo45

Publicado en Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Riesgo Electrico.

Publicado por Firestation en 04/01/2009

dibujo44

Publicado en Legislacion, Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Riesgo Electrico. Disposiciones minimas para la proteccion de la salud y seguridad de los trabajadores frente al Riesgo Electrico. Gobierno Navarra.

Publicado por Firestation en 03/01/2009

dibujo43

Publicado en Legislacion, Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Riesgo Electrico. Legislacion y Normativa sobre Seguridad y Salud en el Trabajo. Generalitat Valenciana.

Publicado por Firestation en 03/01/2009

dibujo42

Publicado en Legislacion, Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

Riesgo Electrico.

Publicado por Firestation en 03/01/2009

prl-peligro-riesgo-electrico

::
1 Parte
::
2 Parte
::
3 Parte
::
Ejercicio práctico
::
Instalaciones Eléctricas
::
Normas de mantenimiento eléctrico

Publicado en Riesgo Electrico | Comentarios desactivados

OIT. Enciclopedia de salud y seguridad.

Publicado por Firestation en 08/12/2008

oit

Web Organizacion Internacional del Trabajo.

Sumario.

Publicado en Desastres Naturales, Formacion, Incendios, Manuales, Prevencion, Primeros Auxilios, Riesgo Electrico, Riesgo Nuclear | Etiquetado: , | Comentarios desactivados

 
Seguir

Recibe cada nueva publicación en tu buzón de correo electrónico.

Únete a otros 333 seguidores

%d personas les gusta esto: